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PG&E Rate Confusion: Most Customers do not Understand their Bill (Video)

If you find yourself confused by how you pay for energy, you are not alone. It has become increasingly difficult to understand the “new” PG&E rate plans and how you are actually charged for energy every month.


Peninsula resident Marsha Townsend told KPIX 5 the letter came as a surprise. It said that PG&E was pulling the plug on the rate plan she’s enjoyed for 25 years, a plan that rewards customers for cutting electricity use between noon and 6 p.m. when most are away. The problem customers have had hasn’t been with PG&E changing plans, but rather because the utility has not made it easy to choose between the four new plans being offered.

It said that PG&E was pulling the plug on the rate plan she’s enjoyed for 25 years, a plan that rewards customers for cutting electricity use between noon and 6 p.m. when most are away.

The problem customers have had hasn’t been with PG&E changing plans, but rather because the utility has not made it easy to choose between the four new plans being offered.

“There was misleading and inaccurate information on many of the letters PG&E sent to the customers,” Hawiger explained.

An administrative law judge agreed. She ruled the transition has “caused widespread confusion” among PG&E customers.

PG&E said the rate change is necessary because the existing peak periods are outdated and there’s now more electricity available during the day because of solar.

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